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20121224
20130101
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KRCB (PBS) 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
minister has laid out how he plans to govern the country. he's back in the role he held five years ago. he said he and his cabinet will make every effort to tackle the challenges japanese face. >> translator: a strong economy is essential to japan's future. my cabinet will carry out bold financial policies, well-timed fiscal policies, and a strategy to encourage private investment towards economic growth. my cabinet will carry out these economic policies and achieve results. >> abe said he and his ministers will revamp japan's foreign policy. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south can korea and even the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening u.s./japan alliance is the first step towards rebuilding japan's diplomacy and security. >> abe promised his government would take the lead in rebuilding northeastern japan. he will achieve results as soon as possible to regain the trust of the japanese people. he said his cabinet is designed to overcome crisis. he was el
government today. abe led his party to a landslide victory in the recent general election. a special diet session will be convened on wednesday afternoon to choose the successor to outgoing prime minister yoshihiko noda. abe will be elected prime minister by voting in the upper and lower houses. he will be the first japanese prime minister in 64 years to be given a second chance. abe was prime minister for one year until he resigned in september 2007. abe plans to immediately start forming his cabinet. he'll hold a news conference in the evening to lay out his governme's vions. the new government is not short on challenges. one urgent task is restoring the country's economy. japan's debt is projected to reach $12.8 trillion by next march. the ratio to the country's gross domestic product is 226%, the worst among developed nations. abe has pledged to halve the fiscal deficit by march 2016. the new government intends to finance its spending without borrowing by fiscal 2020. they hope to achieve the goal by cutting expenses. this would involve squeezing social security costs. all eyes are on
a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by e bill and melina ges foundatn. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to you
been trying to maintain close ties with china. japan's new government has promised to repair frayed ties with south dakota. he spoke with south korea's kim a day after taking office, saying south korea is japan's most important neighbor and they share fundamental values and interests. he alluded to a dispute over the senkaku islands in the sea of japan. kim said it's important to maintain close communications. they agreed to work closely on issues relating to north korea. >>> japanese government officials may be looking forward to the new year, but they have to sort through a slew of economic data first. so what can you tell us? >> you're right, they can't kick up their heels just yet, because they have a handful of economic indicators to sort through for japan for november. the jobless rate improved to 4.1%. officials at the internal affairs ministry say the figure is out 0.1 program poiercentage from the previous month. separately labor ministry officials said job availability was flat. 80 positions were available for every 100 job seekers. the officials say the global economic sl
with government and anti-government forces. he plans to pull power from the assad administration to a new government. but the opposition wants to overthrow the assad administration and the government regards the opposition as terrorist. >>> two insider attacks in afghanistan have rattled the international security forces. an afghan policewoman shot and killed a u.s. contractor in the capital kabul. the victim was a security consultant for the police. other officers detained the woman at the scene. her motive is unknown. another afghan police officer opened fire at a checkpoint in the northern province of jasjon. he killed five colleagues and fled the site. police believe he was a member of the taliban. afghan soldiers and police officers have killed more than 50 members of the international forces this year. the taliban has not claimed responsibility for the kabul shooting, but the group claims to have placed members in the military and police force to launch insider attacks. >>> japan'air self-defense force scrambled fighter jets after a chinese aircraft came close to japanese air space.
of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 50million web users will he to provideheir real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a new way for china's communist leaders to censor their critics. >> ( translated ): since the internet came into china, the chinese government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures, such as shielding, blocking and banning. it has even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites. they j
>> "inside washington" is brought to you in part by the american federation of government employees -- proud to make america work. for more informationbout afge and membership, visit afge.org. >> production assistance was provided by all but in communications and politico, reporting on the political and legislative arena. >> this week on "inside washington," the thrill of victory. >> barack obama has been reelected. >> the agony of defeat. >> this election is over, but our principles in north. >> the year 2012 in review. >> the supreme court has upheld the requirement that every american by health insurance. >> the year of the cliffhanger. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. >> natural disasters. >> like the apocalypse. >> and human tragedies. >> saying someone is shooting in the auditorium. >> political fumbles. >> 5 seconds before you interrupted me. >> and shoppers. >> the seriousness of having a cia director involved in an extramarital affair cannot be overplayed. >> all right, as we look back, let's begin with the top political story of the year -- the freight -- the reelecti
in western iraq staged a mass protest today against the shi-ite-dominated government, the third in less than a week. protesters filled the streets in ramadi in anbar province chanting "topple the regime." the demonstrations began after police arrested ten bodyguards assigned to the sunni finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. thparty won por in ts month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian
get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way the federal government spends money that will have an important effect on state budgets. >> reporter: the pew center on the states reports around 18% of federal grants to states would be subject to sequestration's spending cuts. that works out to about $7.5 billion the states could ultimately lose. >> the real worry right now for states is that as many states start there legislative sessions next month is just the uncertainty from cap
" to postpone a goverent default. the government is on track to hit its borrowing limit on monday, he said with no prospect of congressional action to raise the limit. here now to help us unravel what's going on is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. todd, welcome back. decode this for us. are the players privately as bleak about the prospects as their public statement suggests? >> not as bleak, margaret, but bleaker than they were even a week ago and that's not terribly encouraging. the president as you reported is flying back to washington last night and some members of congress are coming back earlier than others. there will be some meetings here, there have to be some meetings between the principals and the president. there are a couple of options in the last couple of days even though it seems like five days is terribly, terribly short. there shall bills floating out there to keep tax rates where they're at for people making $250,000 and below. th could slide around. there's a senate bill that floats around. there's the presid
opposition groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of violent protes over a gang rape. on sunday, police sprayed tear gas and water cannons after crowds began throwing stones and tipping over vehicles. the protesters demanded stronger punishments for crimes against women after a 23-year old woman was attacked on a public bus last week. the victim was thrown from the bus afterward. she remains in critical condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff talks worried wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 51 points to close at 13,139. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3012. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: in egypt, although one side seems to have clearly won, citizens are still awaiting official results of the country's constitutional referendum. as the sun rose over cairo today, oppositio
to get the government on a sound footing. >> the principal is you've got to protect poor and vulnerable people as you find a path to fiscal sustainability. both are moral issues. >> it's hard to overestimate the importance of getting healthcare to 40 or 50 million people who did not have access to it before. that's just huge and as the wealthiest nation in the world, not to ve healthcare foall was just a profound embarrassment. >> as bishops we've been working on healthcare reform for years. now there are issues about the healthcare reform that's been passed, the affordable healthcare act, that we have concerns about, one, some of the conscience issues. >> i hope he protects religious liberty. i hope he defends the right and protects the right and advocates for religious pluralism. >> the issue of marriage equality because i think he's alredy started to take that on in his first administration and i just feel like we're so close we can taste it. as we saw as evidenced in the past election with more and more states, thank god, passing legislation about marriage equality. >> we have a coa
observation on the unchanging nature of governance comes in its screen play based in part on the book "team of rivals." recently, the script received the new york film critics circle award, one of what will doubtless be many honors. tony first came to most people's attention with the epic pla "angels in america," a devastating account of the a.i.d.s. epidemic while it was at its worst. tony received both a tony award and the pulitzer prize for drama as well as a primetime emmy award for its television adaptation on hbo. that was some 20 years ago. in the years since, tony's reputation as one of our most accomplished and sometimes controversial modern play writes has only grown. welcome. >> thank you. >> you said you worked six years. how did you go about the research? >> i just started reading. we started with doris' book. i was curious to read it. it's a great read and a great book, but it's the definition of a thing that can turn into a 2 1/2 hour script. i knew immediately from what i had read there was going to be too much material if we tried to cover the whole thing and the civil war
next year. the reason? >> monetary easing. all these governments have debt and there's only one way to pay it back and it's to devalue their own currency. and it's a race to the bottom. >> reporter: there are other factors that could also help support gold prices. central banks worldwide have been boosting their gold holdings to diversify their portfolios, and protect against inflation. this year, central banks bought roughly 500 metric tons of gold, up 8% from last year. in addition, many small investors are buying gold as a safehaven from global instability. >> political certainty is a major driving factor. it is not just here. but, in the western europe, and in the far east. and, in china. >> reporter: strong demand for gold exchange traded funds has also helped support prices. the spider gold trust-- ticker gld-- has $75 billion in assets. and it's is backed by physical gold. it also helps that some hedge funds with bylaws prohibiting them from buying futures, can buy gold e.t.f.'s. >> so there are some people that were restricted before. they're not now, and that's supportive o
and development. the same is true of government research grants, but for different reasons. the government wants most urgently to find cures for diseases affecting the largest numbers of citizens. dr. lupski knows all too well about the syndrome as he and several of his family members suffer from the rare neurological disorder known as sara manzano-diaz. charcot-marie tooth. to date there's no cure. >> basically what it is is it is a disorder of the peripheral nerve and that is like the wire that takes the signal from the brain and send it is out tohe muscles and all the things in the preferry that you need to sense your environment and act on your environment. >> classified as a rare disease cmt affects 1-2500 people in the u.s. generally speaking a disease as rare if it afflicts fewer than 200,000 people. many of these diseases are genetic. but in truth, there's nothing rare about rare diseases. >> conditions like for instance, hearing loss or deafness, there's many genes that can -- in which mutati can lead to hearing impairment. but in one specific family an individual single gene will be re
that is memorable. one phrase was interesting. they said to control it, to govern the italians is not difficult. it is impossible so in a situation like that, would have been impossible to control anything anything. so i left. >> so you left. >> and then i became a free bird. >> and how did that feel? >>antasc. at w fantastic. i had been music director all my life, since 1968. london fill harmonia, philadelphia orchestra after-- lascala, 19 years and so after so many years of hard work, not only artistically, musically but about all the other things that-- a good and honest music director has to take care of, i worked so hard that suddenly i felt i, you know, light. i have to do only music when i want, where i want, and how i want. i was-- i felt like a bird as i said before. and that was the period when the new york philharmonic asked me to become the music director. i did several coertsany concertsith the new rk philharmonic, beautiful concerts. i admire those musicians. i think that they are very good. and i have wonderful memories. so when i asked to become music director i was hesitant. i
will roil the economy with a series of fights over taxes, government shut downs and debt limit increases. >> i actually had one hedge fund manager say to me, "oh, they'd never allow to go over the cliff, because they, they being members of congress, would be embarrassed by this. and i don't think wall street understands what it actually takes to embarrass a member of congress on the kinds of issues. >> reporter: if an agreement isn't reached by january 3, the new congress will have to deal with the problem, potentially delaying action even further. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: our guest tonight is bullish for 2013. he's wayne kaufman, chief market analyst at john thomas financial. >> so, wayne, give us your bullish case. make the case for us for why you see the dow and the sep up by as much as 12% in 2013. >> well, i do think there's a very good chance that the major index is the s&p and the dow make new all-time highs, sometime in 2013. you have been going over the housing market doing much better but the entire construction industry, the whole building sector is also d
in india. the indian government looking into whether wal-mart's lobbying activities in the u.s. violated indian laws. shares of wal-mart closed fractionally higher. smith and wesson is buying back an additional $15 million worth of stock, on top of the $20 million repurchase program it recently completed. smith and wesson's shares have fallen nearly 10% since the newtown connecticut shootings. investors bought up gold today, as a safe place to park money while washington lawmakers spar over the fiscal cliff. the precious metal settled $3 hier at $1,663 an ounce. gold prices are on pace for an annual rise of about 6%, the smallest annual gain since 2008. and, supply concerns pushed palladium prices to a nine-month high. investors are worried that tight supplies from the world's top two producers and steady demand from the auto sector could mean higher prices in 2013. it settled at $708 an ounce: over the past year the metal has rising about 7.5%. and finally, for the second day in row the ishares emerging market e.t.f. ended higher. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: once upon
, a key time, between the united states and tripoli. in that treaty the u.s. government says the government of the united states of america is not in any sense founded on the christian religion. there are also courses approved vision for the total separation of church and state in the founding doctrine, correct? >> no, i don't think the total separation of church and sta is in the bible, there's total disebb stabment, emerges in the 19th century. >> wer they dominantly christian, as if it was not founded as a nation free of any required state religion? >> no, i -- no, i -- this -- >> therefore, it was a secular nation, as they saw it, and they wanted it that way. >> i think you have to talk about whether it's by law or by culture. and i think most everybody would have understood early on that by law, the nation was secular, but by choice, the nation was -- in otr words, its people were christians and there's always been that dynamic, people have always understood there's a tension there between a population that's largely christian but uses its freedom to choose christiity an
for the irish. i hope they get their pardon very soon. >> now, the irish government has officially apologize, and the defense minister has pledged to pardon all deserters this year. at last, after 67 years, philip fairing to no longer needs to be afraid. >> the bill is expected to go through the irish parliament soon. some called pigeons fly in rats. others think of pigeons as the symbol of the peace movement. in any case, the capital of pigeons is in turkey where on the syrian border, the tradition of pigeon breeding dates back more than 700 years. >> it is a clock in the morning. time to open up the furniture shop. before doing that, he had to the roof, just as he does every morning. the 56-year-old is expected by 45 pigeons ready for their routine morning flight. his neighbor is also tending to his birds. there is a dovecote on nearly every roof in the district. he has set up security cameras to protect his precious creatures. they are his pride and joy. many wear adornments on their feet and feathers. >> the neck and head should be slim. the plumage should be strong and evenly patterned,
living in almost total isolation, a community that is self- contained, that is governed very strictly. there is an oath of entry. it is very much a monastic community. x the congregation of the elect must pledge himself to live according to the rule of theo community, to love all the children of light, and to hate all the children of darkness." >> the essenes are what we might best call an apocalyptic sect of judaism. an apocalyptic sect is one that? thinks of itself as, first of all, the true form of the religion. yt >> by apocalyptic expectation, i mean that some group has a... an apocalupsis in greek-- a revelation that god is going to finally solve the problem of injustice, unrighteousness, evil in the world, by totally eradicating the evil. that's the terrible price of apocalypse; there's going to be %gzm totally eradicating evil-- and we, the good, whoever we are, are going to live with god, be it heaven on earth, or earth in heaven, forever, in justice and holiness and righteousness. >> among the dead sea scrolls, we hear not of just one messiah, but at least two messiahs. som
like? >> well, i work under three governments under the time -- under the fourth republican front. the government was changing at a rapid pace but you deal with the lady of the house and of course i show the president at christmas and otherwise, you deal with the lady of the house and you have to realize that at that time the work of the cook was very, very low on the social scale. any good mother wanted her mother to marry a child, a doctor, an architect. definitely not a cook. we are genius now. >> rose: what's the difference between a cook and a chef? >> well, the cook is the one who cooks that i do at home and the chef is the chief. so at home i am the cook. if i work in the kitchen and i have five six guys working from me -- >> rose: you're the chef. >> some of new york's great food can be found outside manhattan in the glare of the bright lights. ever since this establishment by the dutch in the 17th century, brooklyn has been a place of immigrants. >> i'm one anybody in the dominican republic then i'm in yemen and the next minute i'm in old ireland. >> it allows some people
rule, the peace and security of augustan and imperial governments. paul is saying those who are on the side of augustus will reach their end first. divine wrath will come upon them first. so paul is very clearly drawing here a remarkable antithesis between the rule of the emperor on the one hand, and the rule of god-- the kingdom of god-- on the other hand. >> narrator: apocalyptic expectations were fueling political turmoil throughout judea. jewish resistance to roman rule was growing daily. >> the situation in jerusalem was becoming increasingly tense through the mid-60s also. josephus tells us that there was growing tension over the last few governors of the countryside. he tells us that they were pretty abusive and... and corrupt administrators, robbing the people, as it were, for the... in order to line their own pockets. josephus also tells us that there's another source of growing tension in the country at this time, because there's an increasing number of bandit and rebel types coming out of the woodwork in the country. and so between growing banditry, the rise of th
the government department that exists to do nothing, a court case that never ends, that's something that you might find. the dust heaps in our mutual friend. the city dwarfed by its own garbage. you have these larger than life surrealistic images which are powerful becausehey' grafted on to the real world. because they grow out of the real world they gain power. they don't become just whimsical. >> charlie: are you agreeing with that, simon? >> oh, god, life. there's something hall use nation about dickens' prose. sometimes you ask yourself what's this guy on? there's a wonderful passage in the christmas carol where he says of majerle's former house. it was up a yard which it had so little business to be in that you couldn't help fancying that it might have run there as a young house playing hide and seek with other houses. once a writer has written that he's tampering with your brain in a most thrilling way. >> charlie: tell me about his home life and his wife and his wife's sister. >> he was married for 23 years to catherine whose father ran the newspaper the morning chronicle that he wrot
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)